You may have never heard of a bioinformatician but there is a big demand for them.

Today while scanning twitter I came across two posts relating to the demand for data science/analytical/programming jobs in both academia and industry.

The first tweet was from the Royal Society and Royal Statistical Society promoting a report on the need for STEM (science,  technology, engineering and maths) skills in the workforce. It is the product of a conference which brought together academics, the Government’s Chief Scientific Adviser and senior representatives from BT, Amazon, Jaguar Land Rover all united by their need for computer and numeracy literate graduates. They estimate that up to 58,000 data science jobs a year are created each year, and there are a large number of these positions which do not get filled because there is a lack of suitable candidates applying.  In industry there is demand to model data to make predictions and decisions on what trends to follow and demand to visualize this data in a way that allows those without such strong numerical skills to make sense of it. They require employees who can communicate effectively what they are doing and think creatively about what further information they can get out of the data that will improve the commercial aspects of the business. It is a worthwhile read for anyone wondering where their mathematics or computer science training might take them.

The second was a tweet from Barefoot Computing stating that in the UK we are losing £63bn from GDP as we don’t have the appropriate technical or digital skill. I don’t know where the statistic comes from, but Barefoot are using it to encourage confidence and enthusiasm in the teaching of the Primary School Computer Science curriculum which is their underlying ethos.

Both of these reiterated to me the  demand there is and will be, in a wide variety of disciplines, for individuals who have strong mathematical, or computer science skill sets. So if you are considering your career options or know someone who is, encourage them to pursue a mathematics or computer science degree as this demand will just keep on growing.

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *